Blue, in Hiding

Holly blue, I think?

Advertisements

Blue Returning

Meconopsis.

Himalayan Blue Poppy.

Of course, they don’t look like that now. They look like this:

wp-1489080460092.jpeg

I bought this plant last year and it’s spent the winter in a small pot. Shrivelled, blackened leaves convinced me of its demise. But, like Doctor Who, it is regenerating!

20170307_171055.jpg

I’ve planted it in a bigger pot, but it really needs to be rooted firmly in the ground, like the one I photographed last year, whose blue radiance drew people towards it like a beacon. One of my neighbours even asked permission to come round and take its photograph. Of course I was delighted. Beauty is for sharing!

20170307_171829.jpg

Looking forward to the blue returning …

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meconopsis

Aspire

Twelve days ago, in my post ‘Into the Light’, I asked myself what I would achieve in the coming week and the rest of my holiday. So, although it might not sound like much so far…

  • I’ve made time to catch up with some old friends.
  • I’ve visited one of my favourite places: Ely Cathedral.
  • I’ve made a significant start on getting rid of the mountain of clutter in my house.
  • I’ve started to plan a writing project. (Excited but nervous about this one.)
  • I’ve done quite a lot of reading.

There’s much more to do, though, so here is a picture to encourage me to aim higher!

Picture1

Geranium Rozanne

After being treated very badly (left over the winter in a small container), this hardy geranium is now looking strong and beautiful.  Here are some pictures of it in sun and after rain.  I think it looks amazing whenever.

It’s a prize-winning plant, voted Plant of the Centenary in the public vote (RHS Chelsea Flower Show).

Link to the Royal Horticultural Society page on Geranium Rozanne:

https://www.rhs.org.uk/plants/details?plantid=4832

Ceanothus

The Ceanothus in our garden has been a pleasure to look at this year.  All the other ones in the area seemed to flower a few weeks earlier (perhaps different varieties, or just in sunnier spots). So I wasn’t expecting such a wonderful show. Bees adore it, as do a host of other insects. I found it quite difficult to photograph the bees because they were just so, well, active!  But here’s my attempt…

There’s another one on my Instagram (katkarradz).

Canterbury Bells

I always think this is a wonderful name for a flower. I hadn’t seen them for years (or perhaps I just hadn’t been looking), but noticed these in a small local garden centre. They immediately brought back memories of my dad’s garden. He certainly grew them one year; I don’t remember seeing them there regularly. However, I do have a somewhat unpleasant memory of looking inside one of the perfect, bell-shaped blooms only to recoil at the sight of a thickly woven web with a crabbed black spider crouching inside it. That could explain why they disappeared off my radar.

Their appearance is astounding: rich, blue, glazed flowers and that impressive (I nearly said striking) shape. They need a name which combines tradition, beauty and joy. And they have one: Canterbury Bells (Campanula medium) also known as the bell flower.  Apparently they were supposed to represent gratitude, or faith and constancy. I’m grateful to have found them again!

I hope to grow some next year.  That spider has frightened me for long enough!